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'Garden Sheds Online'

Welcome to 'Garden Sheds Online', our aim is to be able to offer the finest choice in Quality timber buildings and by careful selection of our suppliers are able to do so. We are not just another internet shop who just sells the products, knowing nothing about the production methods, our background is in manufacturing and retailing garden buildings for over 20 years so we have the knowledge as to the requirements of a good solid long lasting garden shed. We also have had an garden buildings internet presence since 1996 so totally understand the needs of all our potential clients.

We offer a full garden shed advice and robot-tondeuse service both before, and after, you have made your purchase as we appreciate how important this is to you. We understand that your new garden shed should fulfil all your garden needs and with the choice of garden buildings suppliers on our site we can offer the correct advice to ensure you receive not only the best value but at the most competitive price. For your peace of mind Titan and Diamond buildings can be viewed at this display site.

Diamond Timber Garden Buildings

Diamond Timber Garden Building Our Diamond Timber Garden Buildings are probably the best garden buildings available and as these buildings are erected free of charge (no struggling to build, which most suppliers leave you to do) you can rest assured that your new timber garden building will be erected correctly to ensure that your new garden shed will last a great deal of time. Made from Redwood timber and not the cheaper white wood used by most of the larger garden building manufacturers. Diamond Garden Sheds are also able to be made to different sizes and these garden buildings can be customised to your precise requirements.

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Titan Timber Garden Buildings

Titan Timber Garden Building Titan Timber Garden Buildings was started by us in 1979 and owned by us to 1998 and during that time we put into place very strict quality guidelines for all the timber garden buildings made. We also made the conscious decision to only use Redwood timber as our garden buildings manufacturing experience proved this was far superior to the cheaper and more knotty white wood. We are pleased to say that these same high standards are maintained throughout their garden sheds and garden buildings ranges. Titan can also offer a great of customisation on all their garden buildings and shed ranges and also they can offer any size building rather than the normal limited range which most garden shed manufacturers can not offer.

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Malvern Timber Garden Buildings by MPB

Midland Garden Buildings (MPB) Malvern Timber Garden Storage Sheds - Workshops - Hut Malvern Timber Garden Buildings by Midland Portable Buildings have been making timber sheds and garden storage buildings for many years. Malvern deliver all their garden buildings and storage sheds using their own fleet of purpose built vehicles throughout England, Wales & Scotland (up to the Caledonian Canel). Delivery is free in England & Wales with a surcharge to Scotland. They are probably the only company who can install the building at the same time, anywhere within England & Wales. They offer a large range of shed sizes but due to the logistics are unable to customise any of their garden buildings or sheds.

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Will I Need Planning Permission ?

Will you need planning permission ? Generally no, as the building is classed as a 'Portable Building', however it is your responsibility to check with your local planning office. Notable exceptions to the above are listed buildings and conservation areas. It may be that you need to position the building a certain distance from the house, or boundaries, but each area is different, so we're afraid we cannot offer accurate information. Other general guidelines are that it must not take up more than ½ your garden, it must be behind the building line, it should be 1 metre away from the boundary (although most buildings tend to be nearer than this), it should be less than 4 metres high (if it is an apex building) and should be 50 ft away from the nearest road. Check your phone book for your local council and ask to speak to a 'planning officer' to get the exact advice.

Another thing to keep in mind, is your neighbours reaction - always keep them informed of what's happening, and be prepared to alter the plans you had for locating the building if they object - it's better in the long run, believe me!

If you are in any doubt, or would like any advice, please telephone, email, or visit our on-line customer support area for further assistance.

How Do I Decide The Best Location For My New Building ?

It's a question we hear a lot, "where is the best place to site my building ?" and the answer is always the same, "it depends on what you're using it for." Here are some points to remember when siting the building. As always, we'd be delighted to offer as much assistance as we can to help you decide; please telephone, email, or visit our on-line customer support area.

How Do I Build A Suitable Base For My New Garden Shed?

As with any structure, it is essential to provide a firm, level and square base; without which, your building will become unstable and will deteriorate rapidly. Preparations need not be too elaborate and we show the three recommended methods below.

Please keep in mind that these base preparations must be concluded before the arrival of our fitter, as they often work alone, and are not able or equipped to undertake groundwork. If laying a concrete base, please also keep in mind the length of time it will take for the concrete to cure. If the fitter arrives and there is not a suitable base, then the building will be left on a self-assembly basis at full invoice price, or a surcharge will be incurred if they have to return another day.

If you are in any doubt, or would like any advice, please telephone, email, or visit our on-line customer support area for further assistance.

How Do I Prepare For A Building With Bearers ?

PLANNING & PREPARATION

This is the simplest option, however it's not suited to all buildings. If you are constructing the base for a building over 12' x 8', a garage, a sectional building, a corner unit, a gazebo, or a building with no floor, we recommend a purpose-built concrete base.

TOOLS REQUIRED

CONSTRUCTING THE BASE

Cut back any infringing trees and bushes. Allow at least 12" (300mm) all around and 36"-48" above the roof of the building. the proposed base must be firm, level, square and designed to suit the floor size of the selected building as detailed above.

Carefully mark out the exact size of the required shed base, using pegs and string. Check this is square by measuring the diagonals - if the base is square, the diagonal measurements will be equal. Mark 6" all around the outside of this area for the overall size of the 'dig'. Remove the setting out strings, but leave the pegs in place for further use. Remove all vegetation and clear the topsoil to the depth required.

Carefully level and compact the ground using a large spirit level - there must be no bumps or imperfections in the level of the base. The ground must be solid and level for the bearers to go onto. Ieally have bricks or paving slabs for the bearers to sit onto. Titan and Malvern can supply bearers as an option, but Diamond and Parklands do not provide them and you will have to obtain your own bearers and lay them down before your new shed arrives. Check with our office the number of bearers required and where they should be placed.

USEFUL LINKS

GUIDE INFORMATION

This is a guide only. If you do not understand any of it, or are in any doubt, we recommend that you contact a local building contractor. Yellow Pages is an excellent resource for this. If you are in any doubt, or would like any advice, please telephone, email, or visit our on-line customer support area for further assistance. By using this guide, you are exempting Garden Sheds Online from 1st Choice, it's employees and agents, from any liability which may result in any way. How Do I Build A Slabbed Base ? PLANNING & PREPARATION Although a far easier (and cheaper) solution than a concrete base, it is still vital that a slab base is correctly constructed. Especially important is the fact that you need to set the rows of slabs at the correct spacings, and running in the correct direction (at right-angles to the runners on the underside of the floor, or the optional timber bearers, if specified.) These rows may be up to 2' apart, however it is important that you have a row where two-piece floor sections abut each other (if appropriate).

The base must be firm, level, square and designed to suit the floor size of the selected building. When the appropriate company contact you to arrange a delivery date, ask them for a base plan, and make sure that you stick rigidly to this - failure to do so may mean that the building cannot be installed without alterations.

TOOLS REQUIRED

LAYING THE SLABS

Cut back any infringing trees and bushes. Allow at least 12" (300mm) all around and 36"-48" above the roof of the building. carefully mark out the exact size of the required shed base, using pegs and string. check this is square by measuring the diagonals - if the base is square, the diagonal measurements will be equal. remove all turf & vegetation.

Carefully level and compact the ground, laying a sand/cement dry-mix across the area on which the slabs will sit. Compact this dry-mix and ensure that it is level from front to back, as well as side to side - this will save you a lot of time later.

Starting in one corner, bed the first slab into position, carefully levelling in all directions using a large spirit level. It is important that you use a large spirit level as this will give a more accurate reading. Take your time here - it is vital that the first slab is absolutely correct - if it's not, then the whole base will be out of true.

If one of the slabs is too high, and needs realigning, simply lift it and remove a little sand at a time until you arrive at the correct level. Alternatively, gently tap the slab on the top edge of the offending corner with a rubber mallet (or lay a piece of timber on the corner and strike gently with a club hammer) If a slab is too low, lift it and put more dry-mix beneath it until it rises to the correct level.

Take your time here - it is vital that the first slab is absolutely correct - if it's not, then the whole base will be out of true. When you are happy that the first slab is 100%, lay the second slab in the row tight up against it, following the same guidelines as you did with the first. Ensure that the second slab is 100% in-line with the first by laying the spirit level across the join. When slab number two is in position, continue along the row until you get to the outside edge of the base.

The next step is to add the remaining rows - in their correct positions. This is basically a re-run of the first row, but it is again vital to ensure that this, and each subsequent, row is perfectly in line with the original. Again this is achieved by laying a large spirit level across the gaps. The slabs must be perfectly level across the whole site in order to spread the load equally and to avoid any subsidence.

USEFUL LINKS

GUIDE INFORMATION

This is a guide only. If you do not understand any of it, or are in any doubt, we recommend that you contact a local building contractor. Yellow Pages is an excellent resource for this. If you are in any doubt, or would like any advice, please telephone, email, or visit our on-line customer support area for further assistance. By using this guide, you are exempting 1st Choice Leisure Buildings, it's employees and agents, from any liability which may result in any way.

How Do I Build A Concrete Base ?

OUTLINE

The most important thing to do when building your new concrete base is to get it right - please remember that concrete is virtually impossible to fix if something goes wrong! If you're not a competent DIYer we'd recommend you seek advice from a local builder. If you are happy to take on this job, take your time, plan the job and read on!

PLANNING

The base must be firm, level, square and designed to suit the floor size of the selected building. Contact us to check the exact base size of your chosen model, as these will vary - it doesn't necessarily follow that an 8' x 6' building will have a base size of 96" x 72" - generally it won't.

When designing the base, it is vital that you take into account whether or not the building has a floor as this will influence the size and design of the base. If it does have a floor, you should add 1" (25mm) to the above dimensions. If it does not have a floor, we will guide you accordingly - please do not use these instructions. We will be happy to provide a detailed base plan for your individual needs in this instance.

Concrete is a mixture of 'all-in' ballast, Portland cement and water. For this type of base, they are mixed to the ratio of:

1 Part Cement 5 Parts 'All-In' Ballast BALLAST 'All-in' ballast (20mm) is usually sold in 40kg bags at your local builders merchant or DIY superstore. 1.25 bags are needed to produce approx. 1 cubic foot of concrete. Therefore, the formula to calculate the amount of ballast required is as follows:

Example:
Shed Base = 8' Long x 6' Wide x 3" deep
Volume = 8' x 6' x 0.25' = 12 cu ft
Add 1/3 for compacting = 4 cu ft
'All-in' ballast required = 16 cu ft
16 x 1.25 = 20 bags of 20mm 'all-in' ballast

Quantities for other size bases may be worked out using these figures. The golden rule is to order on the generous size when buying materials. Excavations can seldom be measured accurately.

CEMENT

Quantities for other size bases may be worked out using these figures.

TOOLS REQUIRED

PREPARATION

Cut back any infringing trees and bushes. Allow at least 12" (300mm) all around and 36"-48" above the roof of the building. the base must be firm, level, square and designed to suit the floor size of the selected building as detailed above.

Carefully mark out the exact size of the required shed base, using pegs and string. Check this is square by measuring the diagonals - if the base is square, the diagonal measurements will be equal. Mark 6" all around the outside of this area for the overall size of the 'dig'. remove the setting out strings, but leave the pegs in place for further use. remove all vegetation and clear the topsoil to the depth required. carefully level and compact the ground.

For ordinary garden sheds, a thickness of 3" (75mm) is sufficient in most situations. on soft clay, or on larger buildings, increase the thickness to 4" (100mm) laid on 2" (50mm) of finely broken and compacted hard-core if required. half the depth of the base (approx.) should be above ground level.

Replace the setting out strings onto the pegs and check the original measurements. Check the markings are still square by checking the diagonals. These strings are used for positioning the concrete form work. This is made from 2" (50mm) thick timber and should be as wide as the depth of the concrete slab.

Use a tape measure, spirit-level and try-square to set out the form work accurately. This is nailed onto pegs driven into the ground. These pegs should be sited on the outside of the form work in each corner and every 2' (600mm) It is very important that the pegs do not protrude above the top of the form work as this will make the levelling off of the concrete very difficult. Ensure the top of the form work is carefully checked and is level all around (use a long spirit level)

MIXING THE CONCRETE

Try to mix alongside the base site so that the concrete can be placed by shovel, otherwise use a wheelbarrow. Use a plastic bucket (3 gallon) for accurately measuring materials. Use another bucket for measuring water.

Mix well in the proportion:

LAYING THE CONCRETE

Place a layer of concrete into the form work. Compact this down with a rammer taking particular care to push the concrete into the corners and edges. Tap the sides of the form work with a hammer to help produce a solid edge to the slab. Continue placing layers of concrete into the form work and compacting until full.

Use the tamping beam with a chopping and sawing motion across the slab; working from one end to the other. This will level off the concrete, leaving it flush with the top of the form work. The concrete should be tamped flat as it is poured. After tamping the concrete should be smoothed out with either a wooden or a plastic float - this allows the batons of the floor to sit evenly.

Concrete must not be permitted to dry out too quickly or be damaged by frost whilst wet. Cover with plastic sheeting until the concrete is hard and spray with water for several days to allow it to dry out slowly.

When base is ready, remove the form work and tidy around the base, ready for delivery of your new building. Fill the 6" (150mm) around the edge of your new base with pea shingle to prevent 'splash-back' as rain drips to floor.

USEFUL LINKS

GUIDE INFORMATION

This is a guide only. If you do not understand any of it, or are in any doubt, we recommend that you contact a local building contractor. Yellow Pages is an excellent resource for this. If you are in any doubt, or would like any advice, please telephone, email, or visit our on-line customer support area for further assistance. By using this guide, you are exempting 1st Choice Leisure Buildings, it's employees and agents, from any liability which may result in any way.

How Do I Maintain My New Garden Building ?